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The Georgia Division

Sons of Confederate Veterans

 

 

 Sesquicentennial

of the War

Between the States

 

We Commemorate the 150th Anniversary of the War of 1861-1865.

 

 

Why should we continue to commemorate a bloody and unnecessary war that was fought 150 years ago?

 

The War Between the States was the most defining event in our nation's history:

 

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Where there were more American casualties in this war, than in all other wars from the American Revolutionary War to the Vietnam War, all combined;

 

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Where the effects of that war is still felt today by the way our government in Washington DC enforces control over it’s citizens;

 

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Where the principles of the old South: less government, less taxes, more local control, and more individual responsibility are principles embraced by most Americans today.

 

 

We should all be aware of these important facts and understand the reasons our Southern ancestors fought.  Now, how and why did Georgia become involved?                     

 

When Georgia legally seceded from the Union of States on January 19, 1861, in accordance with Amendment 10 of the United States Constitution, Georgia was not at war with the Northern States. Georgia, like the other seceding Southern States, was an independent Republic wanting nothing more than to be self governing and to be left alone in peace

 

Abraham Lincoln called upon 75,000  men to invade the Independent Southern States on April 15, 1861.  This unconstitutional act prompted the states of Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee and Arkansas to secede as well, joining the newly formed country, the Confederate States of America. Thus, with the invasion of the South, this began the bloodiest war in our American history.

 

Why Commemorate the Confederate Soldier?

When the South was invaded, Georgia and other Southern States called upon their sons to do their duty to defend their state, homes and family from invasion. These men went to do their duty, not as aggressors or in the spirit of conquest, but to protect their homeland from an unjust invasion.
 
More than half of the Union and Confederate casualties were from the hardships and disease found in camp life.  This was especially true for the Southern troops who nearly always lacked the basic necessities of food, clothing and medical supplies, unlike the Northern troops, who had plenty.
 
The sacrifices made by the Confederate Solider are inconceivable today. They would march for days with little or no rest, very little food, some with no shoes and  in the heat of summer and the frigid cold of winter.  Fatigue, hunger and sickness was commonplace for these soldiers. 
 
Despite the hardships endured by the Confederate Soldiers they pressed on to perform their duty. In nearly every conflict these soldiers were typically out numbered and out gunned 3 to 1.
 
The “Rebel Yell” made these brave soldiers famous.  It demonstrated a fighting spirit, courage, tenacity and gallantry allowing them to prevail in most of the major conflicts of the war. Sadly they fought an invader with unlimited reserves and resources, making victory impossible.
 
Even during the last year of the war when they knew that victory was impossible, the Confederate Soldier continued to fight courageously to protect their homes and families,  to the very end.
 
They received no great bounty or pay for their service nor did they ask for any monuments or special attention.  They wished only to be remembered with the truth behind their heroic and noble struggle, in America’s second War for Independence.
 
 
Georgia’s War Statistics

 

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In the 1860s, Georgia's population was approximately 480,000.  Over 125,000 of them served in the Confederate States of America. This was approximately 26% of the State’s population.

 

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Over 30,000 Georgia Confederate Soldiers lost their lives during the War.

 

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There were more Georgia soldier casualties in the War Between the States than in all other wars combined.

 

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Of all white males aged 13 to 43 who died in the war, 6% were from the North and an extraordinary 18% were from the South

 

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It is estimated that there were over 50,000 civilian casualties in the South, and over 200,000 Southerners (both black and white) were left homeless, due to the Northern invasion.

 

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An estimated 100 million dollars worth of intentional and unnecessary property damage is attributed to the Northern invasion of Georgia. That is equal to over 17 billion dollars in modern currency values.

 

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More Confederate POWs died in Northern Prison Camps than Union POWs died in Southern Prison Camps, even though the Union had the provisions to care for all the POWs in all of their Camps.

 

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According to the 1860 census, the total population of the country was 31,183,582. The percentage of families who owned slaves was only 8%.  This clearly shows that slavery was not the driving factor of the war, as some people would lead you to believe

 

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There were 500 to 600 women and children, from the Roswell and New Manchester textile mill villages in Georgia, who were claimed to be "war contraband" by US General Sherman. They were sent to prison camps in the North and most were never heard from again. 

 

Why We Commemorate the Confederate Veterans?

 

We commemorate them because:

 

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nearly 258,000 Confederate Soldiers died protecting their homes, families and our Constitution;

 

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they fought bravely and nobly against overwhelming forces and odds;

 

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they suffered inconceivable hardships to the very end;

 

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they were called to do their duty as Americans......as fathers and as sons, and they served without hesitation;

 

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these soldiers are owed that the truth be told about them and about the War;

 

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these Confederate soldiers were our ancestors, and without question, they deserve our respect.

 

You make your choice!

 

 

 

“Do your duty, in all things. You cannot do more, you should never wish to do less”.

 

Robert E. Lee 

 

 

 Proclaim Your Southern Heritage

 

JOIN THE

SONS OF CONFEDERATE VETERANS

Est. 1896

 

Call toll free….1-866-728-4642

 

www.georgiascv.org

 

SCV Application Form

 
Georgia Division, Sons of Confederate Veterans